Pressure Cooker Hints and Tricks

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Liquids

Soup stock, tomatoes, juice, etc., this should be considered as a substitute for an equal amount of water, but oils are not part of the liquids. Add milk after venting because it has a tendency to boil over and scorch. Learn More

Soups

Your pressure cooker will cook soups in a matter of minutes instead of hours. DO NOT FILL pan more then 3/4 full of liquid. Cook the soup stock from bones and meat first; reduce pressure; then add other ingredients. Add the ingredients, as desired and finish cooking. After soup is cooked liquids may be skimmed off or add more water may be added, and thickeners especially if soup stock is very rich.

Your pressure cooker will cook soups in a matter of minutes instead of hours. DO NOT FILL pan more then 3/4 full of liquid. Cook the soup stock from bones and meat first; reduce pressure; then add other ingredients. Add the ingredients, as desired and finish cooking. After soup is cooked liquids may be skimmed off or add more water may be added, and thinkeners especially if soup stock is very rich.

Bean And Lentils

A boon for beans, peas and lentils, the pressure cooker quickly soaks them in a mere two minutes. After rinsing and an additional 10 to 20 minutes of high pressure cooking these nutrition packed nuggets are ready to serve or use in chili, stews or soups.

Vegetables And Fruits

Vegetables are the ultimate pressure cooker companion. Colors remain brilliant, nutrients are retained and flavors become more intense. Slice, shred or quarter in uniform pieces for optimal results. Delicious, homemade fruit sauces, jams and chutneys are also a snap to concoct.

FROZEN VEGETABLES: Frozen vegetables should not be thawed before pressure cooking. The only exception to this rule is corn on the cob which must be completely defrosted. Bread the block of frozen vegetables apart into smaller pieces to assure uniform cooking this is easily done with the hands except for spinach which must be cut into about 1" pieces. One-half water is sufficient for cooking any quantity of frozen vegetable because the cooking time is so very short. Time for cooking carefully so that vegetables will not be overcooked and reduce pressure instantly.

Rice Really Fast

Pressure cook rice to fluffy perfection in half the conventional time. Always use a heat diffuser on the burner to prevent scorching. For each cup of rice (includes long grain white and brown, arborio, basmati and wild rice), use 2 1/4 cups water, broth or other liquid. Do not fill the cooker more than half way. Cooking times will vary with the type of rice. Enhance the flavor of rice by adding one of the following to the pot prior to cooking: 1 clove crushed garlic, 1 bay leaf, 1/2 to 1 tsp. dried basil, oregano or thyme or a dash of cayenne pepper.

Use Molds In Dessert Preparation

Preparation of steamed puddings and custards requires the use of molds. The individual custard cups are standard size. For large puddings and bread recipes, a one-quart mold or bowl may be used. Suitable bowls may purchased from pressure cooker dealer. Aluminum foil makes an excellent cover for any mold. Copper-tone molds can be used in the pressure cooker. Just place the mold of food on the rack in the pressure cooker over 1 cup water, set the control of 15 pounds and when it jiggles, remove from heat and let pressure drop normally.

Cooking Oil

Oil tends to keep foods that foam at safe level during cooking such as dried vegetables or beans that tends foam, forth and sputter. By adding oil it keeps foam as safe and desirable level. When cooking dried vegetables do not fill cooker over one-half full!!!

Frozen Vegetables

Frozen vegetables should not be thawed before pressure cooking. The only exception to this rule is corn on the cob which must be completely defrosted. Bread the block of frozen vegetables apart into smaller pieces to assure uniform cooking this is easily done with the hands except for spinach which must be cut into about 1" pieces. One-half water is sufficient for cooking any quantity of frozen vegetable because the cooking time is so very short. Time for cooking carefully so that vegetables will not be overcooked and reduce pressure instantly.

Fruits

Fresh fruits cook very quickly. Apricots, cherries, peaches, and plums are brought to pressure to 0 pressure, then reduce pressure normally. Pears are cooked 2 minutes, then reduce normally. Pineapple takes 6 minutes then reduce normally. Sugar to taste should be added to the fruit AFTER it is cooked--about 1 cup per quart of cherries or plums; 1/2 cup per 2 lbs of apricot, peaches or pears.
FRUITS: Fresh fruits cook very quickly. Apricots, cherries, peaches, and plums are brought to pressure to 0 pressure, then reduce pressure normally. Pears are cooked 2 minutes, then reduce normally. Pineapple takes 6 minutes then reduce normally. Sugar to taste should be added to the fruit AFTER it is cooked--about 1 cup per quart of cherries or plums; 1/2 cup per 2 lbs of apricot, peaches or pears.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

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