Pressure Cooker Rice Cooking Timing Charts

Pressure Cook Rice Timing Charts
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Pressure Cook Rice Timing Charts

Rice is one of those staples that are found in every kitchen. Although there are plenty of rice cookers available in the market that can help you prepare rice, pressure cookers can actually prepare rice much faster than any other method. Usually, it takes about half the time to prepare rice in a pressure cooker than it does in a rice cooker. Because a lot of pressure cooker models are already outfitted with a rice cooking function, the results you get are typically a lot more consistent and faster.

What to remember when making rice in a pressure cooker

Always use the natural release method

When preparing rice, the natural release method tends to work better than the rapid release method only because the rapid release of rice generally results in undercooked rice. The rapid release method also causes a foamy gush from the pressure cooker that can be dangerous.

The water to rice ratio

To cook rice successfully on a pressure cooker, it is important that you get the water to rice ratio right. Below is a guideline that will help you cook the most common types of rice. Please note that the times might vary based on the rice you are using, as well as the pressure cooker model and brand you have.

Pressure Cooker Rice Cooking Timing Charts

  1. White Rice, long grain: Basmati, Jasmine, Texmati

Basmati rice originates from India while Jasmine is originally grown in Thailand. Textmati rice, on the other hand, is a variety of basmati rice that is grown in Texas. The rice to water ratio should be 1: 1 ½. The rice should be fully cooked in 4 minutes.

  1. White Rice, short grain

Short grain rice typically has round grains that plump up and become sticky when prepared. The rice to water ratio should be kept at 1: 1 ½. The rice should be prepared for 8 minutes.

  1. White Rice, medium grain

Medium grain rice usually has shorter and wider kernels compared to long grain rice. When cooked, it becomes tender and will cling together. The rice to water ratio should be maintained at 1: 1 ½. The rice will be ready after about 7 minutes.

  1. Brown Rice, Short Grain: Basmati, Texmati, Sweet Brown

Brown rice is usually a lot chewier than white rice, which makes it ideal for puddings and sushi. The rice to water ratio should be left at 1: 2. Brown rice will require about 18 minutes to fully cook.

  1. Brown Rice: Medium Grain

Medium grain brown rice will produce light and fluffy results. The rice to water ratio should be 1: 2. Cook for 16 minutes.

  1. Brown Rice: Long Grain

Brown long grain rice has a nutty flavour. When cooked, it becomes fluffier and lighter compared to short grain brown rice. The rice to water ratio should be kept at 1: 2. Your rice will be ready in 15 minutes.

  1. Wehani Rice

When cooked, wehani rice produces a flavour that can be likened to hot buttered popcorn. Wehani rice has a flavour that is close to basmati. The rice to water ratio should be

1: 2. The rice should be ready in 20 to 22 minutes.

  1. Wild Rice: Manomen, “Water Grass”

Wild rice has its origins in North America. Low in fat content and high in B vitamins, the rice will cook in 20 to 22 minutes. Maintain rice to water ratio of 1: 4.

Pressure Cook Rice Timing Charts
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